BBN-ANG-219/w
Shakespearean Comedies on Page, Stage and Screen (Shakespeare komédiái írásban, színpadon és filmen) in spring 2015
Hargitai Márta, Tue 12:30–14:00, R423/a, host: DES (R338)
3-credit lecture, 30 h/term; strong prereq: BBN-ANG-211 213 215
description & set texts
BBN-ANG-219/w Shakespeare on Page, Stage and Screen (Shakespeare írásban, színpadon és filmen) with some theatre improvisation games in spring 2015 Hargitai Márta, Tue 12:30-14:00 R423/a, host: DES (R338) description & set texts Shakespeare's comedies on page, stage and screen both big and small. Active in-class participation in discussions as well as lively, interactive presentation of topics using visuals are encouraged. Password: acting out. Please print this out and bring with you to the first class session on 10 Feb. Take it either as a lecture or as a seminar: Requirements for the seminar: regular attendance (up to 4 absences are tolerated); set texts (as listed in weekly syllabus) read in full and in English for the appropriate seminars; copies of set texts in English brought in for the appropriate seminars; 2 presentations of two or three topics depending on the number of pages to be covered (see topics numbered below) with accompanying useful and detailed handouts (see requirements below) for group-mates & teacher; active in class participation, at least passing mark (60%) on in-class test to be written on 6 May. If you meet all of the above requirements, you will be offered a grade. If you do not, or if you want to get a better grade, you should be prepared to take an oral examination in the exam period. Exam topics are the same as those issues and problems covered by the articles below and those included the critical editions of the 2-4 plays (final list of plays to be discussed in class). To comfortably pass the written exam, you need to read at least 3-4 articles on each play, from the list below altogether. For the exam you can bring the articles you’ve read, but no handouts or other material can be used. Requirements for the lecture: try to show up for the written exam (as indicated below) and be prepared to discuss in a meaningful argumentative way critical comments from the articles below and various “problems” from the plays. If you cannot show up, or if you fail the written exam, you should register for one of two oral exam dates in the exam period. Exam topics are the same as those issues and problems covered by the articles below and those included the critical editions of the plays. To comfortably pass the exam, you need to read at least 3-4 articles on each play, from the list below altogether. For the exams you can bring the articles you’ve read, but no handouts or other material can be used. Primary source: Only critical editions are allowed: use (New) Arden Shakespeare or New Cambridge Shakespeare or Oxford Shakespeare critical edition of the plays. Secondary sources: Introductions in critical editions, articles below If you see http://www.jstor.org/stable/.... next to the journal article’s title and author, it means the full article can be downloaded from jstor.org. Jstor is a database which ELTE University has access to. See http://seaswiki.elte.hu/research/Off-Campus_Access_to_ELTE%E2%80%99s_Licensed_Web_Resources Students should present their chosen topics ONLY on the assigned dates! Handouts should: - include warming-up exercises based on the play-text of Macbeth: e.g. free association, quizzes, matching exercises, etc. - summarize the main argument of the articles: preferably in the form of a gap-fill exercise - include warming-down exercises: e.g. comprehension check-questions, true-false statements - all exercises should focus on the Shakespearean play or the chosen topic DO NOT USE ANONYMOUS INTERNET SOURCES!!! Students should present their chosen topics ONLY on the assigned dates! Weekly syllabus 10 Feb.: introduction, application for presentations 17 Feb.: 24 Feb.: 3 March: 10 March: 17 March: 24 MArch: 31 MArch: 7 Apr.: 14 Apr.: 21 Apr.: 28 Apr.: 5 May.: written exam (end-term test): based on critical comments from the articles above and “problems” from the plays to discuss in a meaningful argumentative way. 12 May: retakes, evaluation, farewell Sample set texts / presentation topics (if the group chooses The Tempest among other "comedies"): 1, "Something Rich and Strange": Caliban's Theatrical Metamorphoses Author(s): Virginia Mason Vaughan Source: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Winter, 1985), pp. 390-405 Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2870303 . 2, Why Does Prospero Abjure His "Rough Magic"? Author(s): Cosmo CorfieldSource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 36, No. 1 (Spring, 1985), pp. 31-48Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2870079 3, Prospero's Wife Author(s): Stephen Orgel Source: Representations, No. 8 (Autumn, 1984), pp. 1-13Published by: University of California PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2928555 4, Prospero’s Book Mowat, Barbara A. Shakespeare Quarterly, Volume 52, Number 1, Spring 2001, pp.1-33 (Article)Published by The Johns Hopkins University PressDOI: 10.1353/shq.2001.0016For additional information about this article Access Provided by Eotvos Lorand University at 11/20/10 10:57AM GMT http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/shq/summary/v052/52.1mowat.html 5, Vaughan&Vaughan, Shakespeare’s Caliban. A Cultural History pp. 3-23 (available at SEAS Library) 6, The Function of Music in Shakespeare's Romances Author(s): Catherine M. DunnSource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 20, No. 4 (Autumn, 1969), pp. 391-405Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2868536 . 7, Northrop Frye on Shakespeare. New Haven& London: Yale University Press. 1986. “The Tempest” 171-186 8, Tribble, Evelyn B., "The Dark Backward and Abysm of Time": The Tempest and Memory College Literature—33.1, Winter 2006, pp. 151-168; 9, Notes on the Tempest Author(s): Giorgio Strehler and Thomas Simpson Source: PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art, Vol. 24, No. 3 (Sep., 2002), pp. 1-17Published by: The MIT Press on behalf of Performing Arts Journal, Inc. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3246343 . 10, McAlindon, T. (Thomas), The Discourse of Prayer in The Tempest SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900—Volume 41, Number 2, Spring 2001, pp. 335-355 (at http://muse.jhu.edu/) 11, False Play: Shakespeare and Chess Author(s): William PooleSource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 55, No. 1 (Spring, 2004), pp. 50-70 Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3844322 12, Shakespeare's Indian: The Americanization of Caliban Author(s): Alden T. VaughanSource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 39, No. 2 (Summer, 1988), pp. 137-153Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2870626
requirements & assessment
see above