BBN-ANG-219/v
Shakespearean Tragedies on Page, Stage and Screen (Shakespeare tragédiai írásban, színpadon és filmen) in spring 2015
Hargitai Márta, Wed 10:00–11:30, R423/a, host: DES (R338)
3-credit lecture, 30 h/term; strong prereq: BBN-ANG-211 213 215
description & set texts
http://seas3.elte.hu/seas/cd.pl?c=BBN-ANG-219/v&t=s15 BBN-ANG-219/v Shakespearean Tragedies on Page, Stage and Screen (Shakespeare tragédiai írásban, színpadon és filmen) in spring 2015 Hargitai Márta Wed 10:00-11:30 R423/a description & set texts (in English only) BBN-ANG-219/q Shakespeare on Page, Stage and Screen (Shakespeare írásban, színpadon és filmen) with some theatre improvisation games in spring 2015 Hargitai Márta, Wed 10:00–11:30, R423/a, host: DES (R338) description & set texts Shakespeare's tragedies on page, stage and screen both big and small. Active in-class participation in discussions as well as lively, interactive presentation of topics using visuals are encouraged. Password: acting out. Please print this out and bring with you to the first class session on 11 Feb. Take it either as a lecture or as a seminar: Requirements for the seminar: regular attendance (up to 4 absences are tolerated); set texts (as listed in weekly syllabus) read in full and in English for the appropriate seminars; copies of set texts in English brought in for the appropriate seminars; 2 presentations of two or three topics depending on the number of pages to be covered (see topics numbered below) with accompanying useful and detailed handouts (see requirements below) for group-mates & teacher; active in class participation, at least passing mark (60%) on in-class test to be written on 6 May. If you meet all of the above requirements, you will be offered a grade. If you do not, or if you want to get a better grade, you should be prepared to take an oral examination in the exam period. Exam topics are the same as those issues and problems covered by the articles below and those included the critical editions of the 2-4 plays (final list of plays to be discussed in class). To comfortably pass the written exam, you need to read at least 3-4 articles on each play, from the list below altogether. For the exam you can bring the articles you’ve read, but no handouts or other material can be used. Requirements for the lecture: try to show up for the written exam (as indicated below) and be prepared to discuss in a meaningful argumentative way critical comments from the articles below and various “problems” from the plays. If you cannot show up, or if you fail the written exam, you should register for one of two oral exam dates in the exam period. Exam topics are the same as those issues and problems covered by the articles below and those included the critical editions of the plays. To comfortably pass the exam, you need to read at least 3-4 articles on each play, from the list below. For the exams you can bring the articles you’ve read, but no handouts or other material can be used. Primary source: Only critical editions are allowed: use (New) Arden Shakespeare or New Cambridge Shakespeare or Oxford Shakespeare critical edition of the plays. Secondary sources: Introductions in critical editions, articles below If you see http://www.jstor.org/stable/.... next to the journal article’s title and author, it means the full article can be downloaded from jstor.org. Jstor is a database which ELTE University has access to. See http://seaswiki.elte.hu/research/Off-Campus_Access_to_ELTE%E2%80%99s_Licensed_Web_Resources Students should present their chosen topics ONLY on the assigned dates! Handouts should: - include warming-up exercises based on the play-text of Macbeth: e.g. free association, quizzes, matching exercises, etc. - summarize the main argument of the articles: preferably in the form of a gap-fill exercise - include warming-down exercises: e.g. comprehension check-questions, true-false statements - all exercises should focus on the Shakespearean play or the chosen topic DO NOT USE ANONYMOUS INTERNET SOURCES!!! Students should present their chosen topics ONLY on the assigned dates! Weekly syllabus 11 Feb.: introduction, application for presentations 18 Feb.: Renaissance tragedies 25 Feb.: KL 4 March: KL 11 March: KL 18 March: KL: Lippai Kinga presents Topic 6 (Kurosawa and KL) 25 March: Mc 1 Apr.: break 8 Apr.: Mc 15 Apr.: Mc 22 Apr.: Mc 29 Apr.: Mc 6 May.: written exam (end-term test): based on critical comments from the articles above and “problems” from the plays to discuss in a meaningful argumentative way. 13 May: retakes, evaluation, farewell Presentation topics on King Lear: 1, Frye, “King Lear: The Tragedy of Isolation.” 265-269. In: Kermode, Frank, ed. King Lear: A Casebook. London: Macmillan, 1969. (photocopy provided) 2, G. Wilson Knight, The Wheel of Fire. VIII. King Lear and the Comedy of the Grotesque 160-176 https://ia700504.us.archive.org/6/items/wheeloffire001890mbp/wheeloffire001890mbp.pdf (2 presenters) 3, "The Base Shall Top Th'Legitimate": The Bedlam Beggar and the Role of Edgar in "King Lear"Author(s): William C. CarrollSource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 38, No. 4 (Winter, 1987), pp. 426-441Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2870423 (2 presenters) 4, Jan Kott, King Lear or Endgame from Shakespeare Our Contemporary New York: Methuan, 1963 pp. 100–133 or in A Casebook 270-292 (photocopy provided) (3 presenters) 5, Jan Kott, Peter Brook, and King Lear Leanore Lieblein at https://journals.ku.edu/index.php/jdtc/article/.../1615 (8 pages) 6, Exploring the relation of Kurosawa’s Ran to Shakespeare’s King Lear FRPublié en ligne le 28 janvier 2010 Auteurs : Par Anthony DAVIES at http://shakespeare.edel.univ-poitiers.fr/index.php?id=116 (11 pages) 7, The Play's the Thing: Textual Criticism and Performance of King Lear Alan Gibbs http://community.dur.ac.uk/postgraduate.english/ojs/index.php/pgenglish/article/view/24/23 (20 pages) (2 presenters) Presentation topics on Macbeth: 1, Notes on Macbeth Author(s): Albert H. Tolman Source: PMLA, Vol. 11, No. 2 (1896), pp. 200-219 Published by: Modern Language Association 2, A.C: Bradley: Notes on Macbeth in: Shakespearean Tragedy pp. 466-493 (web) 3, 1, The Secret'st Man of Blood. A Study of Dramatic Irony in MacbethAuthor(s): William BlissettSource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 10, No. 3 (Summer, 1959), pp. 397-408Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2866862 4, Macbeth and His PorterAuthor(s): Frederic B. TromlySource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 26, No. 2 Spring, 1975), pp. 151-156Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2869244 5, The Unity of MacbethAuthor(s): Brents StirlingSource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 4, No. 4 (Oct., 1953), pp. 385-394Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2866474 6, Freud on the Macbeths From Some Character-types Met With In Psycho-analytical Work (1916), by Sigmund Freud (from Wain: Macbeth A Casebook) 7, In Deepest Consequence: Macbeth Author(s): Herbert R. Coursen, Jr.Source: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 18, No. 4 (Autumn, 1967), pp. 375-388Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2867630 . 8, The Moral Thinking of Macbeth Author: J. Gregory Keller Indiana–Purdue University Indianapolis http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/philosophy_and_literature/v029/29.1keller.html pp. 41-56 9, Lady Macbeth and the Daemonologie of Hysteria Levin, Joanna. ELH, Volume 69, Number 1, Spring 2002, pp. 21-55 (Article) DOI: 10.1353/elh.2002.0009 http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/elh/v069/69.1levin.html ((Photo)copy provided) 10, Lady Macbeth's Indispensable ChildAuthor(s): Marvin RosenbergReviewed work(s):Source: Educational Theatre Journal, Vol. 26, No. 1 (Mar., 1974), pp. 14-19Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3206576 . 11,The Sounds of Supernatural Soliciting in "Macbeth" Author(s): David L. Kranz Source: Studies in Philology, Vol. 100, No. 3 (Summer, 2003), pp. 346-383Published by: University of North Carolina PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4174762 12, MacBeth, King James, and the Bible Author(s): Jane H. JackSource: ELH, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Sep., 1955), pp. 173-193Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2871874 13, The Perversion of Manliness in Macbeth Author(s): Jarold Ramsey Source: Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, Vol. 13, No. 2, Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (Spring, 1973), pp. 285-300 Published by: Rice University Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/449740 . 14, from Macbeth A Casebook ed. John Wain (seas library): “The milk of concord : an essay on life-themes in Macbeth” / G. Wilson Knight from Macbeth A Casebook ed. John Wain (seas library): 15, “Shakespeare's imagery and what it tells us” / Caroline Spurgeon ((Photo)copy provided) 16, "’The naked babe’ and the cloak of manliness” / Cleanth Brooks ((Photo)copy provided) 17, Stage and Screen: The Trevor Nunn "Macbeth"Review by: Michael MullinShakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Autumn, 1987), pp. 350-359Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2870509 18, But Was It "Shakespeare?": Welles's "Macbeth" and "Julius Caesar"Author(s): John S. O'connorReviewed work(s):Source: Theatre Journal, Vol. 32, No. 3 (Oct., 1980), pp. 336-348Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3206889 19, Seeing through Macbeth Author(s): Stephen Leo Carr and Peggy A. KnappReviewed work(s):Source: PMLA, Vol. 96, No. 5 (Oct., 1981), pp. 837-847Published by: Modern Language AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/462127 (about two illustrations of Macbeth: Zoffany’s and Fuseli’s) 20, The Curse on Macbeth: extensive web search 21, http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Symbolic+and+thematic+impoverishment+in+Polanski's+Macbeth.-a0304726831, author: Forker, Charles R, title: Symbolic and thematic impoverishment in Polanski's Macbeth.
requirements & assessment
see above