BBN-ANG-212/c
Medieval and Renaissance English Literature (A középkor és a reneszánsz angol irodalma) in spring 2015
Hargitai Márta, Wed 12:00–13:30, R315, host: DES (R338)
3-credit seminar, 30 h/term; strong prereq: BBN-ANG-112
description & set texts
BBN-ANG-212/a Medieval and Renaissance English Literature (A középkor és a reneszánsz angol irodalma) in spring 2015 Hargitai Márta, Wed 12:00-13:30 R315 host: DES (R338) 3-credit seminar, 30 h/term; strong prereq: BBN-ANG-112 description & set texts Please print this out and bring with you to the first class session on 11 Feb. Requirements: regular attendance; set texts (as listed in weekly syllabus) read in full and in English for the appropriate seminars; copies of set texts in English brought in for the appropriate seminars (vocabulary explored beforehand); 1 presentation of one topic (see topics numbered below) with accompanying useful and detailed handout (see requirements below) for group-mates & teacher; active in class participation (continuous assessment); at least passing mark (60%) on in-class test to be written 6 May. To comfortably pass the test, you’ll need to read 1 article from the list below per literary work (Shakespearean sonnets count as 1), and to be able to use them critically when writing 3 mini-essays on 3 “problems” (topics). Students should present their chosen topics ONLY on the assigned dates! Handouts should: - include warming-up exercises: e.g. free association, quizzes, matching exercises, etc. - summarize the main argument of the articles: preferably in the form of a gap-fill exercise - include warming-down exercises: e.g. comprehension check-questions, true-false statements - all exercises should focus on the Shakespearean play or the chosen topic. DO NOT USE ANONYMOUS INTERNET SOURCES!!! If you see http://www.jstor.org/stable/.... next to the journal article’s title and author, it means the full article can be downloaded from jstor.org. Jstor is a database which ELTE University has access to. See http://seaswiki.elte.hu/research/Off-Campus_Access_to_ELTE%E2%80%99s_Licensed_Web_Resources Weekly syllabus 4 Feb.: registration (no class) 11 Feb.: Introduction, application for presentations 18 Feb.: Chaucer: “The General Prologue”, “The Miller’s Tale” Bring along chaucerhandout at http://seas3.elte.hu/coursematerial/HargitaiMarta/index.html handout size 43.50 KiB, uploaded 2007-02-03 16:03:17, type CDF V2 pres. topics/articles to present: 1, Chaucer the Pilgrim Author(s): E. Talbot Donaldson Source: PMLA, Vol. 69, No. 4 (Sep., 1954), pp. 928-936 Published by: Modern Language Association Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/459940 , 2, Chaucer's Prologue to Pilgrimage: The Two Voices Author(s): Arthur W. HoffmanSource: ELH, Vol. 21, No. 1 (Mar., 1954), pp. 1-16Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/2871929 3, The English Fabliau Tradition and Chaucer's "Miller's Tale" Author(s): Robert E. LewisSource: Modern Philology, Vol. 79, No. 3 (Feb., 1982), pp. 241-255Published by: The University of Chicago PressStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/437149 . 4, Comic Illusion and Dark Reality in "The Miller's Tale" Author(s): Alvin W. BowkerSource: Modern Language Studies, Vol. 4, No. 2 (Autumn, 1974), pp. 27-34Published by: Modern Language StudiesStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3194552 . 25 Feb.: The Sonnet Tradition I,: Wyatt, Whoso list to hunt; Shakespeare, Sonnet 18 (Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day…) day?...), recommended reading: The Complete Sonnets and Poems (Oxford World's Classics)(2002) (ask teacher for relevant pages) 1, Becoming the Other/the Other Becoming in Wyatt's PoetryAuthor(s): Barbara L. EstrinSource: ELH, Vol. 51, No. 3 (Autumn, 1984), pp. 431-445Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/2872932 2, "In War with Time": Temporal Perspectives in Shakespeare's SonnetsAuthor(s): David KaulaReviewed work(s):Source: Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, Vol. 3, No. 1, The English Renaissance(Winter, 1963), pp. 45-57Published by: Rice UniversityStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/449544 3, Making Love out of Nothing at All: The Issue of Story in Shakespeare's Procreation SonnetsAuthor(s): Robert CrosmanReviewed work(s):Source: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 41, No. 4 (Winter, 1990), pp. 470-488Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/2870777 4 March: Shakespeare, 71 (No longer mourn for me…), 130 (My Mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun…), 144 (Two loves I have…) recommended reading: The Complete Sonnets and Poems (Oxford World's Classics)(2002) (ask teacher for relevant pages) 1, Shakespeare's Last SonnetsAuthor(s): Henry David GraySource: Modern Language Notes, Vol. 32, No. 1 (Jan., 1917), pp. 17-21Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/2915655 . 2, The Drama in Shakespeare's SonnetsAuthor(s): Robert BerkelmanSource: College English, Vol. 10, No. 3 (Dec., 1948), pp. 138-141Published by: National Council of Teachers of EnglishStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/371802 . 3, Shakespeare's Sonnets: Reading for Difference Author(s): Helen VendlerSource: Bulletin of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Vol. 47, No. 6 (Mar., 1994),pp. 33-50Published by: American Academy of Arts & SciencesStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/3824425 . 4, Shakespeare's "Sonnets": Age in Love and the Goring of ThoughtsAuthor(s): John KlauseReviewed work(s):Source: Studies in Philology, Vol. 80, No. 3 (Summer, 1983), pp. 300-324Published by: University of North Carolina PressStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/4174152 5, Sincerity and Subterfuge In Three Shakespearean Sonnet GroupsAuthor(s): Michael Cameron AndrewsReviewed work(s):Source: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 3 (Autumn, 1982), pp. 314-327Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/2869735 . 6, Teacher to Teacher: Which of Shakespeare's Sonnets Do You Teach to Your Students?Author(s): Chris Bower, Walter H. Johnson, Lewis Cobbs, Jessica K. S. Wang, Deborah L.Beezley and Patricia M. GanttReviewed work(s):Source: The English Journal, Vol. 92, No. 1, Shakespeare for a New Age (Sep., 2002), pp. 18-21Published by: National Council of Teachers of EnglishStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/821941 7, "My False Eyes": The Dark Lady and Self-KnowledgeAuthor(s): M. L. StapletonReviewed work(s):Source: Studies in Philology, Vol. 90, No. 2 (Spring, 1993), pp. 213-230Published by: University of North Carolina PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4174453 8, The Story Contained in the Second Series of Shakespeare's SonnetsAuthor(s): J. A. FortReviewed work(s):Source: The Review of English Studies, Vol. 3, No. 12 (Oct., 1927), pp. 406-414Published by: Oxford University PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/507607 11 March: The Sonnet II,: Donne, “Batter my Heart”; Milton, “On His Blindness” (When I consider how my light I spent… ) 1, John Donne: The Despair of the "Holy Sonnets" Author(s): John StachniewskiSource: ELH, Vol. 48, No. 4 (Winter, 1981), pp. 677-705Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2872957 . 2, Donne's Holy Sonnet XIV Author(s): Arthur L. ClementsSource: Modern Language Notes, Vol. 76, No. 6 (Jun., 1961), pp. 484-489Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/3040128 . 3, Milton's Sonnets Author(s): William McCarthy Source: PMLA, Vol. 92, No. 1 (Jan., 1977), pp. 96-109 Published by: Modern Language Association Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/461417 . 4, Milton's Sonnet "On His Blindness"Author(s): Roger L. SlakeySource: ELH, Vol. 27, No. 2 (Jun., 1960), pp. 122-130Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2871914 5, Milton's First Sonnet on His BlindnessAuthor(s): Ann Gossman and George W. WhitingSource: The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 12, No. 48 (Nov., 1961), pp. 364-372Published by: Oxford University PressStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/512105 6, Milton's First Sonnet on His Blindness Author(s): Harry F. Robins Source: The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 7, No. 28 (Oct., 1956), pp. 360-366 Published by: Oxford University Press Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/510584 . 7, Milton's First Sonnet on His Blindness Author(s): Fitzroy Pyle Source: The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 9, No. 36 (Nov., 1958), pp. 376-387 Published by: Oxford University Press Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/511271 18 March: The Second Shepherd’s Play; Marlowe: Doctor Faustus 1, The Second Shepherds' Play: A Reconsideration Author(s): Maynard Mack, Jr. Source: PMLA, Vol. 93, No. 1 (Jan., 1978), pp. 78-85 Published by: Modern Language Association Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/461821 2, Structure and Tone in the Second Shepherds' PlayAuthor(s): John GardnerSource: Educational Theatre Journal, Vol. 19, No. 1, Special English-Irish Theatre Issue (Mar.,1967), pp. 1-8Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3205087 3, "Doktor Faustus: A Kezdetek." A Dunánál 2003.6-7: 33-45. Doktor Faustus: A Kezdetek Történelem, Legenda, Mítosz És Irodalom Szőnyi György Endre 4, Doctor Faustus and the Sin of Demoniality Author(s): Nicolas Kiessling Source: Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, Vol. 15, No. 2, Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (Spring, 1975), pp. 205-211 Published by: Rice University Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/449667 25 March: Doctor Faustus 1, Marlowe's "Doctor Faustus" and "Sin against the Holy Ghost" Author(s): Gerard H. Cox, IIISource: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Feb., 1973), pp. 119-137Published by: University of California PressStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3816592 . 2, The Orthodox Christian Framework of Marlowe's Faustus Author(s): Joseph Westlund Source: Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, Vol. 3, No. 2, Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (Spring, 1963), pp. 191-205 Published by: Rice University Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/449293 3, The Damnation of Faustus Author(s): W. W. Greg Source: The Modern Language Review, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 1946), pp. 97-107Published by: Modern Humanities Research Association Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/3717028 1 April: spring break 8 Apr.: William Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night’s Dream 1, The Ritual of Midsummer: A Pattern for A Midsummer Night's Dream Author(s): Anca Vlasopolos Reviewed work(s): Source: Renaissance Quarterly, Vol. 31, No. 1 (Spring, 1978), pp. 21-29 Published by: The University of Chicago Press on behalf of the Renaissance Society of America Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2860326 2, The Ritual and Rhetoric of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" Author(s): James E. Robinson Source: PMLA, Vol. 83, No. 2 (May, 1968), pp. 380-391 Published by: Modern Language Association Stable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/1261192 . 3, G.W.Knight. “Dissension in Fairyland.” 65-70. In: Price, Antony. Shakespeare—A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Casebook. Casebook series. London: Macmillan, 1983. (available at SEAS Library) + Sandler, Robert. ed. Northrop Frye on Shakespeare. New Haven& London: Yale University Press. 1986. “ A Midsummer Night’s Dream” 43-50 (photocopy provided) 15 Apr.: MND 4, The Psyche Myth and A Midsummer Night's DreamAuthor(s): James A. S. McPeekReviewed work(s):Source: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Winter, 1972), pp. 69-79Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/2868655 5, The Darker Purpose of A Midsummer Night's DreamAuthor(s): Michael TaylorReviewed work(s):Source: Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, Vol. 9, No. 2, Elizabethan and JacobeanDrama (Spring, 1969), pp. 259-273 Published by: Rice UniversityStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/449779 6, "A Midsummer Night's Dream": Fairy Fantasy or Erotic Nightmare? Author(s): Allan LewisReviewed work(s):Source: Educational Theatre Journal, Vol. 21, No. 3 (Oct., 1969), pp. 251-258Published by: The Johns Hopkins University PressStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/3205466 22 Apr.: William Shakespeare: Macbeth 1, The Secret'st Man of Blood. A Study of Dramatic Irony in MacbethAuthor(s): William BlissettSource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 10, No. 3 (Summer, 1959), pp. 397-408Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/2866862 2, Macbeth and His PorterAuthor(s): Frederic B. TromlySource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Spring, 1975), pp. 151-156Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/2869244 3, The Unity of MacbethAuthor(s): Brents StirlingSource: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 4, No. 4 (Oct., 1953), pp. 385-394Published by: Folger Shakespeare Library in association with George Washington UniversityStable URL:http://www.jstor.org/stable/2866474 29 Apr.: Macbeth 4, Freud on the Macbeths From Some Character-types Met With In Psycho-analytical Work (1916), by Sigmund Freud (about 5 pages) 5, The Curse on Macbeth: extensive web search 6, “Shakespeare's imagery and what it tells us” / Caroline Spurgeon (photocopy provided) 7, “The naked babe’ and the cloak of manliness” / Cleanth Brooks (photocopy provided) 6 May: end-term test 13 May: retakes, evaluation, farewell
requirements & assessment
regular attendance; set texts (as listed in weekly syllabus) read in full and in English for the appropriate seminars; copies of set texts in English brought in for the appropriate seminars (vocabulary explored beforehand); 1 presentation of one topic (see topics numbered below) with accompanying useful and detailed handout (see requirements below) for group-mates & teacher; active in class participation (continuous assessment); at least passing mark (60%) on in-class test to be written on 2 Dec. Students should present their chosen topics ONLY on the assigned dates! Handouts should: - include warming-up exercises: e.g. free association, quizzes, matching exercises, etc. - summarize the main argument of the articles: preferably in the form of a gap-fill exercise - include warming-down exercises: e.g. comprehension check-questions, true-false statements - all exercises should focus on the Shakespearean play or the chosen topic DO NOT USE ANONYMOUS INTERNET SOURCES!!! Students should present their chosen topics ONLY on the assigned dates! Powerpoint and videos encouraged!!!