BBN-AME17-216/b
American literature 4 (Amerikai irodalom 4.) in spring 2019
Bán Zsófia, Thu 12:00–13:30, R432, host: DAS (R306)
3-credit seminar, 30 h/term; strong prereq: AME17-213
description & set texts
This course offers an introductory survey of 20th century American Literature. It is a course intended to complement the American Literature II lecture course. This course offers an introductory survey of 20th century American Literature. It is a course intended to complement the American Literature II lecture course. REQUIRED READINGS 1. The primary readings can be found in the Norton and Heath anthologies, as well as on the internet. Those not available will be sent in pdf. 2. Secondary readings: relevant chapters from Bollobás Enikõ, Az amerikai irodalom története (Budapest: Osiris, 2005). Grades will be based on (1) oral presentation (2) class participation! and (3) final test grade. Attendance. It is assumed that everyone will attend the classes. In accordance with university regulations, students are allowed three absences per semester; with more than three absences, their course will be incomplete. Reading the assigned texts. Students are required to come prepared for class. Not reading the assignment for a class counts as an absence. Syllabus 1. Imagism: Ezra Pound: “In a Station of the Metro”, “A Pact”, L’Art 1910”, “A Retrospect”, “A Few Don’ts”, William Carlos Williams: “The Red Wheelbarrow”, Amy Lowell: “Opal” 2. Modernist poetry: T. S. Eliot: “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”, Langston Hughes: “The Weary Blues”, “I, Too” 3. Modernist poetry: William Carlos Williams: “Spring and All”, Wallace Stevens: “Anecdote of the Jar”, 4. Modernist prose: Ernest Hemingway: “Hills Like White Elephants” 5. Modernist prose: F. Scott Fitzgerald: “Babylon Revisited” 6. Modernist prose: Gertrude Stein: “Miss Furr and Miss Skeene”, “Susie Asado”, “Preciosilla”, Zora Neale Hurston: “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” 7. Modernist drama: Eugene O’Neill: „Long Day’s Journey Into Night” 8. Modernist drama: Edward Albee: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? 9. Postmodern poetry: Sylvia Plath: „Lady Lazarus”, Allen Ginsberg: first section from Howl 10. Postmodern fiction: Lydia Davis: “Story”, “Suddenly Afraid”, “Getting Better”, “Head, Heart” (pdf), Donald Barthelme: “The School” 11. Ethnic literature: Bharati Mukherjee: A Wife’s Story (Heath) 12. Test
requirements & assessment
Grades will be based on (i) class participation,(ii)oral presentation, (iii) final test grade. Attendance. It is assumed that everyone will attend the classes. In accordance with university regulations, students are allowed three absences per semester; with more than three absences, their course will be incomplete. Reading the assigned texts. Students are required to come prepared for class: they must be able to understand the texts, remember details, and formulate their critical comments. Not reading the assignment for a class counts as an absence.